Why Should You Take Online Wine & Food Classes? with Chris Scott

Aug12th

Introduction

Can being a supertaster affect your preferences in alcoholic beverages? Why don’t you find a lot of wineries in Ottawa? How do online classes give you an advantage over in-person classes? How is the pandemic impacting the way you buy wine? Why should you buy wine directly from wineries? How can my Wine App help you find the best wine to pair with your food?

In this episode of the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast, I’m chatting with Chris Scott, a U.K.-based sommelier who published the world’s first-ever wine podcast, the UK Wine Show and who, with his wife, Jane also founded ThirtyFifty, a company which offers fun and no-nonsense wine tastings for private and corporate events.

You can find the wines we discussed here.

 

Highlights

  • How did I come around to wine after growing up around whiskey and beer?
  • Can being a supertaster affect your alcoholic beverage preferences?
  • What caused me to go from wine enthusiast to wine writer?
  • How did the worlds of high tech and wine overlap for me?
  • Why don’t you find a lot of wineries in Ottawa?
  • What type of reading experience can you expect with Red, White and Drunk All Over?
  • What was it like to win the Louis Roederer 2009 Online Wine Writer of the Year award?
  • How do online classes give you an advantage over in-person classes?
  • Why does the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast’s focus on storytelling help you learn about wine?
  • How is the pandemic impacting the way you buy wine?
  • What types of conversations will you be a part of when joining us on our Facebook wine tastings?
  • Why should you buy wine directly from wineries?
  • How can my Wine App help you find the best wine to pair with your food?
  • Which features of my Wine App will simplify your wine buying process?
  • Why is my Wine App beneficial for wine enthusiasts worldwide?

 

Start The Conversation: Click Below to Share These Wine Tips

 

About Chris Scott

Chris Scott is an award-winning wine podcaster and presenter who runs wine tasting company called ThirtyFifty and produces a weekly wine podcast, The UK Wine Show, which is consistently ranked in the top 10 Apple Podcasts’ Food & Drink charts.
Born and bred in New Zealand, Chris spent time as a student working hands-on in the vineyards of Canterbury before graduating with first-class honours in engineering. In 2001, he moved to London U.K. and now holds the WSET Level 4 Diploma in Wines & Spirits, the top qualification. He now heads up a team of 20 wine experts across the UK, between them running more than 500 corporate events, wine courses and private tastings per year.

 

Resources

 

Join me on Facebook Live Video

Join me on Facebook Live Video every second Wednesday at 7 pm eastern for a casual wine chat. Want to know when we go live?

Add this to your calendar:

 

 

Tag Me on Social

Tag me on social media if you enjoyed the episode:

 

Thirsty for more?

  • Sign up for my free online wine video class where I’ll walk you through The 5 Wine & Food Pairing Mistakes That Can Ruin Your Dinner (and how to fix them forever!)
  • Join me on Facebook Live Video every second Wednesday at 7 pm eastern for a casual wine chat.
  • You’ll find my books here, including Unquenchable: A Tipsy Quest for the World’s Best Bargain Wines and Red, White and Drunk All Over: A Wine-Soaked Journey from Grape to Glass.
  • The new audio edition of Red, White and Drunk All Over: A Wine-Soaked Journey from Grape to Glass is now available on Amazon.ca, Amazon.com and other country-specific Amazon sites; iTunes.ca, iTunes.com and other country-specific iTunes sites; Audible.ca and Audible.com.

 

Transcript & Takeaways

What advantages do online wine and food pairing classes have over in-person classes? Why should you consider buying wine directly from wineries? How can my wine app help you find the best wine to pair with your food? How does being a supertaster affect your wine preferences?

That’s exactly what you’ll discover in this episode of the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast. I’m chatting with Chris Scott, a U.K.-based sommelier who published the world’s first-ever wine podcast, the UK Wine Show and who, with his wife, Jane also founded ThirtyFifty, a company which offers fun and no-nonsense wine tastings for private and corporate events. Chris is actually interviewing me on his podcast for this one, so we’re turning the tables, but those tables still have wine on them.

I’ll include links to the wines we tasted and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class — that’s all in the show notes at nataliemaclean.com/89.

Now before we dive in, I want to share something with you that made me smile. A listener to this podcast, Peggy, emailed me to say: “Love your wine recommendations, love your books (can’t wait for #3) BUT I think the best tip ever was about mouth taping! My husband and I both went from rather restless sleep and dry throats in the morning to 8 solid hours of sleep. Thanks!”

You’re welcome Peggy! I’ll try to include more health tips going forward, or maybe something about personal grooming or wardrobe. This pinot noir is okay, but have you tried these shoes?

Mouth taping, by the way, is a growing practise of taping your mouth at night so that you breathe through your nose, not your mouth. The nose has better filters and therefore helps better oxygenate your body at night. I’ll include a link to the tape I use in the show notes as I don’t recommend duct tape — that was painful, plus you don’t want regular tape adhesives on your face.

Okay, on with the show!

 

Well, there you have it! I hope you enjoyed my chat with Chris Scott.

I won’t do my usual takeaways since that would be weird — what did I learn from myself?

You won’t want to miss next week when I’ll be chatting with Chris Scott again, but this time focused on food and wine pairing in-depth. We had so much to talk about that he ended up recording two episodes on his podcast, and I’m doing the same.

In the meantime, if you missed episode 44 on pairing wine and spicy food, go back and take a listen. I’ll share a short clip with you now to whet your appetite.

If you liked this episode, please tell a friend about it, especially one who’s interested in the wine tips I shared.

You’ll find links to the wines we tasted, a full transcript of our conversation, and where you can find us on Facebook live every second Wednesday at 7 pm, including this evening if you’re listening to this on the day it’s published, the mouth tape I use, and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class — that’s all in the show notes at nataliemaclean.com/89.

Thank-you for taking the time to join me here. I hope something great is in your glass this week, perhaps a wine you bought directly from a winery!

 

Transcript

Natalie MacLean 0:00
Finally, people are starting to realise, you can learn about wine and food pairing at home. And it’s easier. I mean, there’s no babysitter, there’s no driving to the class. There’s no be there on Wednesday or it doesn’t work. It’s very flexible. And they get to meet wine lovers around the world, they get lifetime access to the course. So a lot of those factors work in favour of online courses. And I think it wasn’t until COVID changed our minds about a lot of things that we could do online that more people realised. Hey, it’s possible. It’s fun, and I need something to do during quarantine anyway, so I may as well learn about wine and come out stronger when the lockdowns over.

Do you have a thirst to learn about wine? Do you love stories about wonderfully obsessive people, hauntingly beautiful places, and amusingly awkward social situations? That’s the blend here. On the unreserved wine talk podcast. I’m your host, Natalie MacLean. And each week, I share with you unfiltered conversations with celebrities in the wine world, as well as confessions from my own tipsy journey as I write my third book on this subject. I’m so glad you’re here. Now pass me that bottle please. And let’s get started. Welcome to Episode 89. What advantages do online wine and food pairing classes have over in person classes? Why should you consider buying wine directly from wineries? How can my wine mobile app help you find the best wine to pair with your food? And how does being a super taster affect your wine preferences? That’s exactly what you’ll discover in this episode of The unreserved wind talk podcast. I’m chatting with Chris Scott, a UK based sommelier who published the world’s first ever wine podcast, the UK wine show, and who with his wife, Jane also founded thrifty 50, a company which offers fun and no nonsense wine tastings for private and corporate events. Chris is actually interviewing me on his podcast for this one. So we’re turning the tables, but those tables are still loaded with wine. I’ll include links to the wines we tasted and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class. That’s all going to be in the show notes at Natalie MacLean comm forward slash 89. Now before we dive in, I want to share something with you that made me smile this week. A listener to this podcast, Peggy emailed me to say quote, love your wine recommendations. Love your books in brackets. Can’t wait for number three. Bye I think the best tip ever was about mouth taping. My husband and I both went from rather restless sleep and dry throats in the morning to eight solid hours of sleep. Thanks and quote. Well here welcome Peggy. I’ll try to include more health tips going forward or maybe something about personal grooming or wardrobe that Pinot Noir is okay, but have you tried these shoes? Anyway, I do appreciate your email Peggy. Mouth taping by the way, is a growing practice of taping your mouth at night so that you breathe through your nose and not your mouth because the nose has better filters and therefore helps better oxygenate your body at night. I’ll include a link to the tape I use in the show notes as I don’t recommend duct tape. That was painful. Plus, you don’t want regular tape adhesives on your face. Anyway, back to wine and on with the show.

Chris Scott 4:05
Hi, my name’s Chris Scott and I’m here with Nicky McLean. How are you? Natalie?

Unknown Speaker 4:08
I’m fine. Chris, how are you?

Chris Scott 4:10
I’m very good. A little bit winded as I saying I was just went up the stairs because of zoom issues with this is my first ever remote interview. Very exciting. I always do my interviews face to face, but COVID-19 means we are doing it remotely. And also Where are you? You’re in Canada. So that’s a bit far.

Natalie MacLean 4:28
Yes, that’s right. I’m in Ottawa, Ontario. So COVID Yeah, it’s changing everything, including how we can act like this.

Chris Scott 4:35
Normally, I’d have to try and run a trip to Canada past Jane to go and interview you which, to be honest, I would have preferred to do that.

Natalie MacLean 4:43
Right. I would love to come to the UK. But for now, this is what we have. So we’re making the most of it.

Chris Scott 4:48
Yeah. Excellent. Excellent. So just for the listeners, Nikki McLean, your Wow, I don’t know you’ve been in it for what 2006 or even earlier as a

Natalie MacLean 4:57
even earlier Yes, it’s an older vintage for me. Yeah. It’s about 20 years now that I’ve been writing about wine,

Chris Scott 5:03
Ronnie about why today, when we first joined the one tribe, we used to get your net to Kent. It was a newsletter, wasn’t it?

Natalie MacLean 5:09
That’s right. Yeah, I still have the newsletter. I just go by my name now, rather than that accounts

Chris Scott 5:13
for the listeners, because we’ve sort of haven’t really introduced you’re a journalist. You’ve written a couple of books, you do all sorts of online tastings. You’ve got an app. You’re a proper full fledged wine writer slash wine geek.

Natalie MacLean 5:29
Exactly. Yes. I pride myself in being a double geek. So I’m a wine geek and a techie because I came from the high tech world before starting to write about wind. So I love the intersection between the two.

Chris Scott 5:41
Okay, yeah, I’m an engineer, but I’m struggling with some of those technologies. That’s great. Cool. What we can do today is just talk a little bit about yourself and a little bit about what you’ve done and a little bit what your offer and we might just have a little chat about some wine towards the end of it, if that’s alright with you. Sounds great. Cool. So, when did you first get into wine?

Natalie MacLean 6:04
Well, I didn’t have a taste for wine growing up. I come from a Scottish family and Cape Breton Nova Scotia. So it was mostly beer and whiskey in the backyard, not even on the table. So I just didn’t like the taste of beer or whiskey. I got tested later in life, and I’m a super taster, which means I’m very sensitive to bitter tastes. Yeah, so that just was not appealing. And maybe it also had something to do with the beer a breath of my uncle’s in those backyard gatherings. But anyway, I just wasn’t drawn to it. So it wasn’t until I finished graduate school that I finally had the money or the funds to get fancy and I started experimenting with wine and discovered that I really really loved it didn’t have the bitterness at so many wonderful flavours. It prompted me to wonder what’s going on in this glass here. Why do I like this so much. And not anything else alcoholic

Unknown Speaker 6:53
was a

Natalie MacLean 6:54
that would have been in 93 that I graduated from graduate school. So, you know, during that time, I just sort of was experimenting enjoying wine. I took a Somali a programme at night just for fun, and had no notion of writing about it. So it wasn’t until my son was born close to 2000 that I thought, well, I’m home here on maternity leave. I’ve completed a Somali a diploma programme. What can I do to keep my brain alive? So I started pitching articles to local newspapers, magazines, and I landed one and it kind of went from there that gave me the confidence to keep going with it, and not to go back to high tech.

Chris Scott 7:35
Okay, that’s quite cool. What were you doing in high tech,

Natalie MacLean 7:37
I was with a company called Silicon Graphics, which was based in Mountain View, California SGI, which is now the headquarters of Google. And it was a supercomputer company owned Cray as well. And I was their internet evangelist. Okay,

Unknown Speaker 7:52
cool.

Natalie MacLean 7:52
Yeah. So I would go around like to conferences and things and talk about the power of the internet. And I remember on one panel, there was no Amazon wine.com and there was somebody else a florist or something. So, I was starting to get a little exposure to wine that way and the online nature but also, I started arranging all my meetings on Fridays in Mountain View when I had to go to California. I worked from Canada where I am. And then I drive up to Napa and Sonoma on the weekends. So that’s sort of where at first develop that passion.

Chris Scott 8:22
Lovely. Not not in your home vineyards though, because you’re not that far from Niagara on the lake. I got into wine on Niagara on the lake and you used to go to Napa Valley, for goodness sake.

Natalie MacLean 8:33
That’s right. That’s right. doesn’t always happen that way. Never in your own backyard. Yeah, I’m in Ottawa, which is about a six hour drive from Niagara. Okay, of course, I’ve visited Niagara It’s beautiful, beautiful region, wonderful wines. But around Ottawa, we have a few vineyards, but they struggle because on average, we’re colder than Moscow here in Ottawa, where north

Chris Scott 8:54
is what beer and whiskey Yeah, yeah, exactly more beer and whiskey and stand inside and keep them more cool. Coco. So when did you write your first book? So you start doing some journalist work, but you wrote a book in 2006, red, white and drunk all over.

Natalie MacLean 9:09
You can see how seriously I take the subject

Chris Scott 9:13
to do that, because books are one of those things a lot of people write they’re not normally necessarily financially worth the effort sometimes. I’m not sure uglies cases with you. But

Natalie MacLean 9:22
yeah, well, I’ve been writing for magazines. And then I started applying and was fortunate enough to win some writing awards here in North America. And an editor from penguin approached me to write a book. So she planted the seed. Eventually, I went with Random House. I didn’t have a notion to write a book and read white and drunk all over. I kind of approached it as I did my magazine articles, except it was much longer, of course, but it was a day in the life of so I tried to be a sommelier, work in a vineyard work in a wine store, kind of like the new journalism of the 1970s. If you remember Truman Capote he and Joan Didion and Norman Mailer, they all wanted to immerse themselves in the experience so that they could write about it in a richer, deeper way. So that’s kind of what I did. I sort of dove in and took that approach in red light and drunk all over. And surprisingly, it ended up number four on our national bestseller list.

Chris Scott 10:19
So it was quite popular, I think, in the UK as well. I remember.

Natalie MacLean 10:22
Yeah, they launched it there too. And yeah, it did really well. Again, I was surprised. Probably more surprised than anyone.

Chris Scott 10:28
Yeah. And I remember I didn’t know if it was after that or before your next book unquenchable. But I remember, you’d been the IWC wine Educator of the air as well. And

Natalie MacLean 10:38
I came in as a finalist for that award. You

Chris Scott 10:40
win it. I was sure you won that.

Natalie MacLean 10:43
Yeah. Well, judges told me I was one point away, which was kind of nice and kind of like, Ah,

Unknown Speaker 10:49
oh, no, but

Natalie MacLean 10:50
yeah, no, no, no, it’s all good because I gained a lot of confidence from entering a competition like that and coming so close. Yeah. But you know, the other writing awards spurred me on gave me the confidence because I didn’t come from a wine background. I didn’t even come from a journalism background. So this was something completely new. I came from high tech. Yeah. So anyway,

Chris Scott 11:09
you want the Louis road area network? cannot pronounce it. Last one my wife shared with me for that, but

Unknown Speaker 11:16
Louis roederer I think it’s how you say it, and they had the presentation in that big egg building in downtown London. I just love that. That was spectacular. What’s that egg shaped? Chicken.

Natalie MacLean 11:29
That’s it. That’s it. Oh, it looks like an egg to me. Or what is the covary the egg shaped fermenters that they use these days for their lives. It was at the top of that building. So we had a dazzling view of London at night it was I’ll never forget that night.

Chris Scott 11:46
I went into Ward there years ago. We went up there for the final and the award. It was an ecommerce award because it was very early in the days and we’d set up an online website for wine. I think we came second actually which was amazing, but I wasn’t really expecting when I just went up there to drink some wine. And have a really good time.

Natalie MacLean 12:03
Absolutely. There is no way I was gonna miss that party with the reporting Louis roederer of course, costs and just fortunately to win, you got a magnum of Louis roederer. The Crystal actually it was like, Oh my goodness. Anyway, that was great. So tell

Chris Scott 12:18
us what you’re doing now because you’ve got podcasts, you’ve got online courses. I mean, we’re talking just before the end of the year saying that was COVID-19 is a bit of a disaster for you. It’s actually been quite positive. Business wise, not realising.

Natalie MacLean 12:32
Exactly. Exactly. Business wise, for sure. I have taught wine tasting courses in person in the past and mostly through my book tours. But since the get go, my business has been online, as you say, whether it’s the mobile apps, or the courses or the newsletter, but with the courses what I was really surprised what happened during COVID and it’s still happening is I’ve seen a real spike in new students signing up for my food. Pairing courses because I think Finally, people are starting to realise you can learn about wine and food pairing at home. And it’s it’s almost easier. I mean, there’s no babysitter, there’s no driving to the class. There’s no be there on Wednesday or it doesn’t work. Yeah, it’s very flexible. And they get to meet wine lovers around the world, they get lifetime access to the course. So a lot of those factors work in favour of online courses. And I think it wasn’t until COVID changed our minds about a lot of things that we could do online that more people realised. Hey, it’s possible. It’s fun. And I need something to do during quarantine anyway, so I may as well learn about wine and come out stronger when the lockdowns over.

Chris Scott 13:42
Yeah, exactly. Exactly. So how does that work? Let’s just touch on your podcast because it hasn’t been going for too long. Couple of years now, isn’t it unreserved wine?

Natalie MacLean 13:49
That’s right, unreserved wine talk. It’s been a year and a couple months now. I started in December 2018. Yeah. So it’s still a baby powder. Cast, but it’s been going really well. Apple Canada named it one of the best lessons of 2019. So it’s doing well in our small pond here.

Chris Scott 14:09
Yeah, I’ve listened to a few episodes. It doesn’t seem to be that good towards Canada.

Natalie MacLean 14:13
It’s actually not it’s wine from around the world. So I’ll interview winemakers, sommeliers, writers I interviewed you, Chris.

Chris Scott 14:20
What are your best interviews? Yeah.

Natalie MacLean 14:25
Great because you know how to tell stories. And so that’s what I’m looking for. I’m looking for storytellers. So I’ll interview weird and wonderful winemakers like Randall Graham from Bonnie Dune, or Charles back from South Africa. Goats do roam label, or I’ll take some of the A’s who again know how to tell a good story because I think it’s through stories that we learn about anything including wine. And so you’re right. The focus isn’t on Canadian mind though. Of course, I’ve talked about that. I’ve interviewed people about it, but it’s worldwide like recently. The interview was with Dr. Laura catina from Argentina. Who’s also an emergency room doctor. We recorded that interview before COVID. So I wasn’t taking her off the front lines. But she had a wonderful perspective not only on winemaking, but wine and health, wine and moderation from her medical studies. So I love it. I love connecting with people through the podcasts.

Chris Scott 15:19
Yeah, she’s done some interesting work with what’s his name? I forgotten the name of the doctor. The one Diet book on was not very true, but proof. God has been Polly finos then it’s probably finos but police prosiding now I can’t remember there’s a subcategory of polyphenols that’s Argentinian wines can have quite high levels of that, like resveratrol in terms of the antioxidant behaviour.

Natalie MacLean 15:41
That’s right, because they’re high altitude so they get more sun exposure. It’s not just about heat, but it’s the sun and what it does to the grapes and what’s in there. It’s all their high altitude plantings.

Chris Scott 15:52
And tell us about your Facebook. You do online tastings to support the wine online course isn’t it because you’ve got videos and then they debate and some online tastings. Is that right?

Natalie MacLean 16:02
Yes, that’s right. I post free online tastings on Facebook every second Wednesday at 7pm. Eastern. So that’s sort of like Toronto, New York time. But I do get people from the UK joining late night bunch, I guess. I even get people from Australia who must be drinking wine with their breakfast but so they’re really dedicated

Chris Scott 16:21
now. That’s just classic Australian behaviour.

Natalie MacLean 16:25
Love it. And so we we tackle a wide range of topics there too. And recently, I was doing pairings and talking about Niagara wines here in Ontario, because, of course, the wineries had to pivot so to speak. And their tasting rooms are closed, the restaurants are closed. So that’s a big source of revenue. They’re shipping direct. So that’s what we’ve dedicated the last two Facebook tastings to. We’ll be moving on to other topics now. But we really wanted to get behind our local wineries and say, listen, it’s easy. You can order direct online and I think that’s a Another thing that COVID has changed, that people realise just how easy it is to get wine shipped directly to your door.

Chris Scott 17:06
I imagine niagra is a bit like the UK actually, in that respect, because it’s the small producers who rely on selladoor sales. They’re the ones that have been absolutely hammered at the moment because they just can’t sell their product. They don’t have the channels to sell it. Whereas, if you can get into the main stream channels, there’s quite a lot of demand and multiple outlets in the UK. Anyway, supermarkets and almost anybody are doing a good trade. But if you focused on selladoor, then that’s really bad news.

Natalie MacLean 17:33
Exactly like most wineries in Niagara and I would argue around the world are small and that’s a good thing. There are seasonal, they’re paying attention to winemaking, but it also means they don’t have the volume to fill the large liquor store chains. And while alcohol sales are up in those large chains, the small wineries aren’t even on the shelf, so we really need to support them by getting behind their direct sales efforts. Yeah, I think that’s quite good. But yeah, I do have to agree with supporting local It’s better for the environment. And you’re supporting local businesses. I mean, all kinds of local businesses are suffering. But here is a product that is the highest value add agriculturally, I think on the planet. And so when you support your local winery, you’re adding so much to your domestic economy. So for instance, in Niagara, every bottle we buy here adds about, I think it’s like every dollar we spend adds 90 to our local economy versus, like $1 for an imported wine. So it’s it’s dramatic with the spin off jobs and tourism and restaurants and so on. It really makes a huge difference.

Chris Scott 18:42
So you’ve also got an app, tell me about your app. How did you manage to do that?

Natalie MacLean 18:45
It was a huge project. So I launched the mobile apps back in oh my gosh, I think it was 2010. So I’ve been working on the apps for 10 years. And of course, I came from high tech, so I didn’t code them myself. Yeah, I’d love to be that Kiki, but I’m not. But I have been working on the for a while. So I worked with a coding team. So they’re both on iPhone and Android. And they do two things, they will scan a front label and instantly bring up my wine reviews scores pairings, as well as any reviews from the community. I’ve also incorporated a barcode reader. So when a bottle has a barcode, you can use a separate scanner on the app to access the info. And it’s the only app in the world that does both. So you’ve got your label and your barcode to access the data and make sure the data is clean. Because what we don’t want is bringing up weird wine listings or for the app to tell you. Yes, this is the wine and you have to travel 3000 miles to Wisconsin to get it. So my app will tell you where it’s available in the liquor store closest to you. So it has real time geo sync inventory data. So that’s very useful to people they find regardless of where you are here. liquor store that has the wine that you want. And how many bottles are in that store?

Chris Scott 20:04
I mentioned only works mainly for Canada. Is that right?

Natalie MacLean 20:06
Yes, it’s mainly in Canada, though, I’ve got app users from around the world because it’s got a lot of features that are relevant to anyone, you know, even just scanning the label or the barcode and accessing clean data, meaning a good review, a review that you can rely on a professional one plus food pairings, and then it’s got a whole bunch of other features like a virtual wine cellar log, you can keep track of your favourite wines. It’s got a pairing tool in it. It’s got a lot of different things. So I would say 90% of it is very relevant and applicable, regardless of where you live. It’s that last 10% of accessing store data close to you that is most relevant for Canadians.

Chris Scott 20:48
Yeah, I can understand that as well. And I suppose in Canada, you don’t have to deal with a lot of different people. Usually, there’s a lot of state monopolies in Canada isn’t there.

Natalie MacLean 20:56
Exactly. So it simplifies making an app not so sure. It’s the best thing for wine lovers for diversity and prices. But it sure makes developing an app easier to get that stock and inventory current all the time.

Chris Scott 21:09
All right, then Natalie, I think we’re gonna wrap it up there. I wouldn’t mind talking to you next week about some of your wine food pairings and talk to us about your philosophy on food and wine matching.

Natalie MacLean 21:17
That would be terrific, Chris. I look forward to it. She’s very much.

Well, there you have it. I hope you enjoyed my chat with Chris Scott. I won’t do my usual takeaway since Well, that would be weird. What did I learn from myself? You won’t want to miss next week when I’ll be chatting with Chris Scott again, but this time we focus on food and wine pairing in depth. We had so much to talk about that he ended up recording two episodes on his podcast, and I’m doing the same here. In the meantime, if you missed Episode 44 on pairing wine and spicy food, go back and take a listen. I’ll share a short clip with you now. to whet your appetite the flavours that survive heat are sweet and sour. That’s why both crisp and slightly sweet wines can cool the palate after a fiery en slot. So you think about wines like Riesling in Muscat, especially those from cool climates like Germany, Canada, Alsace, where the wine preserves its refreshing acidity. These wines are the equivalent of diving into the ocean after getting a sunburn, invigorating and soothing for your tongue. Long after you swallow their silver threat of acidity lasts as long as that hot wire of spice in your mouth. They also have complimentary aromas and flavours of spices, limes, lemons, green apples and flowers. Think about the garnishes that often tame the heat. In spicy dishes. You’ll find those aromas and the lines that go best with them.

If you liked this episode, please Tell one friend about it this week, especially one who’s interested in the wine tips I shared. You’ll find links to the wines we tasted a full transcript of our conversation, where you can find me on Facebook Live every second Wednesday at 7pm including this evening. If you’re listening to this on the day it’s published the mouth tape by us and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class. That’s all in the show notes at Natalie MacLean comm forward slash 89. Thank you for taking the time to join me here. I hope something great is in your glass this week. Perhaps a wine that you bought from a winery directly and not while you’re wearing.

You don’t want to miss one juicy episode of this podcast, especially the secret full body bonus episodes that I don’t announce on social media. So special Grab for free now at Natalie MacLean comm forward slash subscribe, maybe here next week cheers

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