Which Cheeses Go Well With Wine? Janice Beaton Shares Pairings

Sep23rd

Introduction

Why does cheese, like wine, spark obsession? Why do certain wines and cheeses have a similar flavour profile? What makes Canadian cheeses unique? Do different types of cows’ milk produce different flavours in cheese? How do you pair goat cheeses with wine?

In this episode of the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast, I’m chatting with Janice Beaton, owner of Janice Beaton Fine Cheese which was known as Calgary’s best place to buy artisanal, fresh-cut cheeses from around the world.

You can find the wines we discussed here.

 

Highlights

  • How did Janice develop her passion for cheese?
  • What is it about cheese that sparks our obsession?
  • What similarities can you find between cheese and wine?
  • Why might you notice a similar flavour profile between certain wines and cheeses?
  • What makes Canadian cheeses unique?
  • How are immigrants an integral part of the Canadian wine and cheese industries?
  • Why will you get a different flavour profile with Canadian cheeses, even when cheesemakers stay true to the European processes?
  • How is cheddaring done?
  • What is clothbound cheese?
  • Will you taste a difference in cheeses made from different types of cows’ milk?
  • What flavour profile can you expect with Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar?
  • Which Canadian wine should you try with Avonlea Cheddar?
  • Can you eat the rind of ash cheese?
  • How does the flavour of goat cheese change with aging?
  • What taste notes would you associate with mineral notes in cheese?
  • Which wines would you enjoy paired with goat cheese?
  • What causes the crunchy bits you find in some cheeses?

 

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Transcript & Takeaways

Welcome to episode 95!

Why does cheese, like wine, spark obsession in us? Why do certain wines and cheeses have a similar flavour profile? Do different types of cows’ milk produce different flavours in cheese? What is the cheddaring process in making cheese?

That’s exactly what you’ll discover in this episode of the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast. I’m chatting with Janice Beaton, who joins me from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, to chat about pairing wine with many types of artisanal cheeses from around the world.

This conversation took place on my Facebook Live video show a couple of years ago so please keep that in mind as the context for her comments. Sadly, her cheese shop has closed since we spoke, but Janice remains passionate about cheese and wine.

I’ll include links to the wines and cheeses we tasted, where you can find me on Facebook live every second Wednesday at 7 pm, including this evening if you’re listening to this podcast on the day it’s published, and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class — that’s all in the show notes at nataliemaclean.com/95.

My favourite time of day for a glass of wine is 5 p.m., which I used to call the arsenic hour, but now I call it the shoulder hour…

That time between the afternoon and dinner.

What’s your fave time of the day for wine?

We’re just 5 episodes away from number 100. Who would you like me to interview on this show? It could be a celebrity who now has a wine label, a winemaker, a sommelier, a wine or food writer, or someone with a great wine story.

I’m going to give away 3 signed copies of my second book, Unquenchable, which Amazon named one of the best books of the year to 3 people who come up with the best ideas.

So please email me at natalie@nataliemaclean.com or tag me on social media with any ideas you have to make it fun. And there will be wine.

Okay, on with the show!

 

You can also watch Part 1 and Part 2 of the video interview with Janice that includes bonus content and behind-the-scenes questions and answers that weren’t included in this podcast.

 

Well, there you have it! I hope you enjoyed my chat with Janice Beaton. Here are my take-aways:

I love how Janice draws the parallels between cheese and wine fanatics because they’re both so sensual, playing with all of our senses – taste, touch, smell, sight and even hearing if you count those squeaky cheese curds.

I also like her take on why wine and cheese go so well together, not just as liquid and solid, but also that wine’s acidity is a terrific counter to the fat and protein in cheese.

Then there’s the immigrant influence for both wine and cheese: ancient recipes brought from the Old World to the New and find new expression here with different climate, soil, terroir.

You won’t want to miss next week when I’ll be chatting with Janice Beaton again.

In the meantime, if you missed episode 62 with Jamie Evans, go back and take a listen. You’ll learn about a completely different type of pairing — wine and cannabis. I’ll share a short clip with you now to whet your appetite.

If you liked this episode, please tell one friend about it this week, especially someone you know who’d be interested in the wine and cheese pairing tips that Janice shared.

You’ll find links to the wines and cheeses we tasted, where you can find me on Facebook live every second Wednesday at 7 pm, including this evening if you’re listening to this podcast on the day it’s published, and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class — that’s all in the show notes at nataliemaclean.com/95.

Thank-you for taking the time to join me here. I hope something great is in your glass this week, perhaps a wine that pairs perfectly with the cheese you love!

 

Full Transcript

Janice Beaton 0:00
Think cheese is very sensual. The visual the smell of such simple ingredients can yield such profound variety. And,

Natalie MacLean 0:09
yes, that sounds so much like wine. They both start with liquids, they’re both fermented. And they both get more complex as they age, at least the best kind do. So what similarities Do you see with wine and cheese?

Janice Beaton 0:22
I think you’re absolutely right, Natalie, there are so many things that wine and cheese have in common. And the whole concept of terroir, that environment in which grapes are grown or animals feed, we often talk about the fact that when you think of grape vines growing in soil that is also providing the grasses that goats are grazing on, there’s no big surprise that there’s a similar flavour profile between the wine and the cheese from that region.

Natalie MacLean 0:54
Do you have a thirst to learn about wine? Do you love stories about wonderfully obsessive people, hauntingly beautiful places, and amusingly awkward social situations? Well, that’s the blend here on the unreserved wine talk podcast. I’m your host, Natalie MacLean. And each week, I share with you unfiltered conversations with celebrities in the wine world, as well as confessions from my own tipsy journey as I write my third book on this subject. I’m so glad you’re here. Now pass me that bottle please. And let’s get started. Welcome to Episode 95. Why does cheese like wine sparked an obsession in us? Why do certain wines and cheeses have a similar flavour profile? The different types of milk produced different flavours in cheese. And what is the chattering process in making cheese? That’s exactly what you’ll discover. In this episode of The unreserved wine talk podcast. I’m chatting with Janice Beaton, who joins me from Cape Breton Nova Scotia, to chat about pairing wine with many types of artisanal cheeses from around the world. This conversation took place on my Facebook Live video show several years ago, so please keep that in mind as the context for her comments. Sadly, her cheese shop has closed since we spoke but Janice remains passionate about cheese and wine and I’ll include links to the wines and cheeses we tasted, where you can find me on Facebook Live every second Wednesday at 7pm including this evening if you’re listening to this podcast on the day it’s published, and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class. That’s all in the show notes at Natalie MacLean comm forward slash 95. My favourite time of day for a glass of wine is 5pm which I used to call the arsenic hour. But now I call it the shoulder our that time of the day when we crawl down from inside our heads back down into the reality of our bodies. It’s the time between afternoon and dinner for me. What’s your favourite time of the day for wine? I’d like to hear from you. We are just five episodes now away from number 100. Who would you like me to interview on this show? It could be a celebrity who now has a wine label? a winemaker, a sommelier, a food or wine writer, or someone who has a great wine story to tell. I’m going to give away three signed copies of my second book unquenchable, which Amazon named one of the best books of the year to the three people who come up with the best ideas. So please email me at Natalie at Natalie MacLean calm or tag me on social media with any ideas you have to make it fun. And there will be wine. Okay, on with the show.

More than 10 years Janice Beaton fine cheese has been known as Calgary’s best place to buy our seasonal fresh cut cheeses from around the world. Owner Janice Beaton joins me from Cape Breton Nova Scotia where she’s visiting her sister, giving us the unique opportunity to taste some local cheeses and wine together. Welcome, Janice.

Janice Beaton 4:30
Thank you, Natalie. It’s a pleasure to be here. All right. So tell

Natalie MacLean 4:33
me about how your own passion for cheese started.

Janice Beaton 4:38
Well, it started really a long time ago here in Cape Breton. In fact, when I was a wee little girl and we made cheese on our farm, and it’s one of my most vivid memories is that of my grandma making cheese I mean everything from us extracting the rennet to do the coagulation to the whole process of ageing and where our press was up behind The chicken house and I mean, hanging on her skirt. I was just so fascinated by the whole process so that’s where it all began and it’s just grown. I think since that time.

Natalie MacLean 5:10
Those first tastes are often stay with you forever. What kind of cheese did she make?

Janice Beaton 5:14
Well, as we say here, homemade cheese. I mean, what people and they still do it. It’s basically a raw cow’s milk cheese that aged anywhere from a couple of weeks to months depending on how people like to have it. So it’s almost like a Wensleydale one of the English cheeses you know it’s got a bit of an open face crumbly texture, and very Cowie.

Natalie MacLean 5:37
I like that. It’s kind of the equivalent of describing what wine is yummy. Yes.

Unknown Speaker 5:42
Yeah, it works.

Natalie MacLean 5:43
Yeah, exactly. So now you own this marvellous. She’s retail shop charcuterie host classes, you’ve got a kitchen where people are dining area now. That’s really taking your passion for cheese a long way from those early days in Cape Breton. How did you develop that kind of full fledged professional interest in it?

Janice Beaton 6:03
Well, I think like lots of entrepreneurs, an idea presents itself. And it came from a friend of mine when I was kind of between things after I’d sold a coffee business and was casting about for the next thing. And she said you should want to shop because I probably ate a knew a bit more about cheese than the average person. But anyway, I just thought she’s right. And five months later, after raising capital and trying to learn about cheese, which really just happened on the job once the shop opened, building the store, all those things that are part of starting a small business and getting open before Christmas, which was of course very critical. So yeah, here we are. 12 years later. Wow. Now,

Natalie MacLean 6:43
why are people so obsessive about cheese? I know about obsession and wine, but I know you’re probably encountering obsession and cheese. What is it about cheese that just people want to follow it? I mean,

Janice Beaton 6:54
yesterday, a guy on the beach here I haven’t seen for 30 years said I love cheese. I mean, all kinds of cheese. He was going on rhapsodising and unsolicited really other than my friend saying Janice owns a cheese shop in Calgary. And I think cheese is a really simple product. But it’s very essential. There’s something about it that appeals to our senses. I think the visual the smell of such simple ingredients can yield such profound variety. I think there are many things about it. But the sensuality of it is, I think, a big factor for a lot of people.

Natalie MacLean 7:31
You’re talking my language when it comes to wine. Yes, that sounds so much like wine. And I think sometimes Well, you know, they both start with liquids. They’re both fermented. And they both get more complex. as they age, at least the best kind do. So what similarities Do you see with wine and cheese? Are they along that line or anything else?

Janice Beaton 7:51
Well, I think you’re absolutely right, Natalie, there are so many things that wine and cheese have in common. And the whole concept of terroir, that environment in which grapes are grown or animals feed, I mean, oftentimes, when I teach classes or at events that we host, we often talk about the fact that when you think of grape vines growing in soil that is also providing, say, the grasses that goats are grazing on, there’s no big surprise that there’s a similar flavour profile between the wine and the cheese from that region. So you know, I often use it as a general rule of thumb when people are thinking about pairing, but they have so much in common. And the thing about wine that I love too is that when and cheese complement each other so well, because text, they’re liquid versus solid. And that acidity that many white wines in particular have. It’s such a perfect counterpoint to the fat and the protein and cheeses. You know, they go hand in hand for so many reasons.

Natalie MacLean 8:48
Hmm, excellent insights. I know it’s really hard to generalise about Canadian cheese just like Canadian wine because we’ve got such a diversity of styles from coast to coast. But if you were to try to generalise, are there some factors that make Canadian cheese different for you, say versus France or Switzerland, just on the very broad level?

Janice Beaton 9:10
Hmm, that’s a question I haven’t thought about before. I have to say that I don’t see that there’s something about Canadian cheese that makes it unique and different from cheeses from countries in Europe, for example. I’m really proud of what our cheese makers in Canada are doing. I think coast to coast we have fabulous things and I’m I know there’s many more for me to try many that I haven’t tasted yet and I tend to get to all of them. But I think the styles of cheese I think people often pattern cheese’s that so many immigrants have come You know, Canada is made up of so many immigrants from other countries, which is wonderful and people bring recipes from their home country and then how those recipes express themselves here as a function of the animals, the area Varian, you know, whatever the case might be. So I think it’s interesting to see the expressions of cheeses from other countries may Hear I think that is what makes it unique. It’s someone’s making something that’s like agree err, you know from Switzerland and they’re making that cheese here. It’s going to be very different than what they made or what they’ve had back in their home country. But yeah, I think that’s kind of how I approached that one.

Natalie MacLean 10:16
That’s excellent. And again, just to draw another parallel with wine, that’s exactly what has happened with a lot of our wine regions, both in Nova Scotia, Niagara and even out on BC. I mean, they were immigrants that first started the wine industry, especially from Germany or Austria, that was cool climate grapes that can survive our climate. But the expression of the wine here is completely different from say, a German Riesling or an Austrian one, that sort of thing. So they were just made for each other. I think

Janice Beaton 10:44
she’s well, an interesting thought I was thinking about this a little bit, in fact, because one of the cheeses we’re going to taste a little bit is that beautiful heavenly cheddar from Prince Edward Island. But Scott Linkletter when he decided to make his beautiful English style, the only English clothbound cheddar, or style cheese that’s being made in Canada today. He had Armand his cheese maker went to the Orkneys and worked with a cheese maker there for months. So I’m in really learned the craft of true English cheddar making. So when you look at what was created on Prince Edward Island, it’s very different than English cheddar, it’s the same in style, they really stuck to the principles and traditions of cheddar making. But because of the terroir, because of the milk from the cows, I believe Holsteins are pretty much the breed that provide the milk for the cheese. But when you think about that, it’s a very different cheese from an English cheddar, yet very similar. So it’s a great example of what happens as we’re describing about creating something in a different place with the same recipe. Absolutely, you’ve done your job.

Unknown Speaker 11:48
I’m hungry.

Janice Beaton 11:50
Right, let’s get to it.

Natalie MacLean 11:51
Let’s try that avidly cheddar because I was able to get some of this here where I am in Ottawa, it was the only local one I could find. But it gave me some substitutes. But let’s try the avonlea cloth bound, as you said, the only cloth bound cheese in Canada, what does that mean cloth bound? And how does it affect the cheese?

Janice Beaton 12:10
Well, that’s going back to the process of making cheddar in England A long time ago. And chattering in and of itself is a process where when something is shattered, in the cheese making process, it’s cut, basically, in a grid pattern. Once the current forms, it’s cut in a grid pattern, and then it’s packed into the moulds. And then you know, there’ll be Wait, you know, it’ll be in a press and where the way is, can be extracted. So the multi line with the cloth, and that back in the day really was a means of preservation. It was a way of protecting the cheese that is held in the same way today by those traditional cheddar makers, shutters in England are cloth bound. Or bandaged is another term that people use, and sometimes they have a bit of a wax coating on the band as well. We don’t need that, right. We don’t need that. Yeah, when we get our wheels of avonlea and your very big bear ABS seven chilo drum for me, 16. Anyway, we pull the bandage off, they come Vantage in tact, and we pull it off. So it’s a fun part of the job.

Natalie MacLean 13:13
So what do you get when you taste this avidly cheddar? Yeah, tell me. Sorry. You’re talking about the Holstein cow. So I’m also interested in how their milk expresses itself versus another type of cattle?

Janice Beaton 13:27
Well, I think, you know, that’s, in some ways, probably a fine point, in that, you know, milk being you know, sort of the substrate if you will that cheesemakers worked with and then they work their magic, depending upon what their particular predilections might be in terms of the process of cheese making or what, where they want to end up with the finished product. But there are some things you know, protein content can differ from breed to breed, that content can differ. So those things then when they work with those factors can really affect how the finished product winds up. But I think I mean, when I taste this cheddar, I love it so much. I just think it’s so fabulous. And it’s great that it’s a cheese that’s federally licenced, because that means it’s available across the country. But for me, and maybe it’s just because I know it’s from Prince Edward Island, but I just think it tastes like mashed potatoes and butter. Now

Natalie MacLean 14:20
Yeah, no, that’s pretty good. As long as the battery’s melting. Hmm. Oh, it is beautiful, isn’t it? It is bright and sunshiny. It is

Janice Beaton 14:29
yellow. The texture Oh, that’s a great way to put it the taste of yellow I mean, it’s the joyful cheese. And it’s got a fabulous texture. It’s dense, creamy, but not too dry. I mean, they’ve done a spectacular job of really, I think creating a wonderful variation on the theme of an English clothbound cheddar made in the traditional style. I do think it’s earthy I mean when we have our non traditional chatters here and by either not made in the in those drums and bandaged in cloth, I think often they’re not as bad Gentle and earthy as an English cheddar is they’re often not going to be as sharp as we make great cheddar here in Canada, and a lot of them people are looking for Tang and sharpness. And I don’t experience that the same way in an English cheddar, nor do I in this cheddar from cows Creamery. Oh, it’s true. It is. It’s all very integrated. Balanced is how I would describe it if it were online

Natalie MacLean 15:22
now. And so speaking of that, the chief should not stand alone.

Janice Beaton 15:26
What I was wondering when we were going to get tonight

Natalie MacLean 15:29
thirsty, surely got some great Nova Scotia wines that you’ve suggested today? What would you start with? Which one? Well,

Janice Beaton 15:35
I think based on his cheese, I would start with the luck of vineyards 2011, title Bay, and the feeling that’s going to be the match for this one.

Natalie MacLean 15:44
Okay. And why is that because that’s a

Unknown Speaker 15:47
well, I was good to me.

Janice Beaton 15:49
I think because what I’ve learned because I’ve been tasting some title based from different wineries here. It’s an off dry rate for Iola. That’s what we end up with. But what I like about this one is that it has really great acidity. And as I mentioned earlier, acidity and wine is just such a partner to cheese. But in the case of the avonlea, because it’s dense, and it’s earthy, and I think there’s something about the acidity and the off dry. There’s something slightly aplly to me about this wine. And I think that you know, when you think apples and cheddar, I mean, I’ve often paired ciders with with this cheese. And I think there’s something actually, you know, maybe it’s the Annapolis Valley piece that’s coming through and the wine being the home of many great Apple varieties. But I really like the acidity you’re ahead of me, I think I better see what this catch up on talk

Natalie MacLean 16:43
you drink. Well, I’ve got lucketts tidal Bay and tidal Bay, as you probably know, is a new appellation, a hot new one or a cool new one, I should say. I’ve got Yoast title day. And I’ve got gaspereau title day. And what I love about all three of these wines, because I’ve tasted them recently is that there’s that Apple note almost Apple Blossom almost a bit floral. And so it reminds me a little bit of Argentine, Toronto’s or viani a, sort of this profusion of fresh meadow, which to me would dovetail right into a cheese. So you’ve got the maybe the more earthy or grassy taste with the cheese at the metal flowers in the glass. And I think it’s just lovely. And the acidity helps too. It really does. It’s a acidity, really, a match for the salt of the cheese, is that what it’s dealing with and the cheese?

Janice Beaton 17:34
I would say and more particularly, it’s dealing with the fat and the protein, both of which are friends. You know, I don’t hold either of those things in any ill repute at all, I think I think that in protein are great things. So having acidity like this wine, and I think you nailed it, Natalie, when you talk about Meadow flowers. I mean, I get that it’s like, well, flowers. I mean, it’s our suggestion, but the athlete, you know that fruit, that sort of Apple fruit character is definitely there. And I really think that these are the things that really lift the cheese. I mean, the cheese is great, but I think they complement each other so well that they make each other better.

Natalie MacLean 18:11
Absolutely. And that’s what it’s all about increasing your pleasure with the two together rather than on their own. Janice, let’s start with the ash crust. Cheese. I must say that the one you suggested for me just looks nasty.

Janice Beaton 18:26
So beautiful. Natalie,

Unknown Speaker 18:29
really? Are we supposed to eat this? Like the other side too? Yes. The chassis? it’s fuzzy.

Janice Beaton 18:35
No, I don’t think you’d have made it back. You know, 100 years ago in France when they were using wood ash, real Ash on the surface of these cheeses, which is what they are simulating those cheeses from ancient times, even though it’s not necessary anymore, because they were used a lot for protecting the cheeses but also the ash imported the cheese in developing a city. So I don’t think you’d have done so well back then. Change times change here we are. It’s an aesthetic today this and look at this when

Natalie MacLean 19:05
you break it open. This looks attractive inside here. I want to appeal this chance though. But the cross gives the taste as well.

Janice Beaton 19:11
No, in fact, what we typically say in the shop is that in fact it’s purely aesthetic. This is not the wood ash phase of your this is just a sort of an organic matter that’s been used to give the same effect visually. It doesn’t really impart any flavour whatsoever. Do I have to eat it? You don’t have to. We always say that. But we do encourage people to try things and smile a little bit you might surprise yourself. I mean Ryan’s in general and maybe that’s a little a moment to say unless you can see that a rind has lacks or die or something on it. That’s foreign. That’s not a food substance. We always encourage people to try Ryan’s because oftentimes they contribute a great deal to the overall experience of cheese, both texturally and flavour wise. So we do encourage people to try them and you know, then you’re at choice. If you don’t Want to eat them if you don’t like the taste and just stick with the paste, which is the centre part of the cheese?

Natalie MacLean 20:04
Mm Hmm, this is good. Okay, this is good. Wow. I can’t even taste those fuzzy parts. I mean, it all tastes really good. Great. I got a

Janice Beaton 20:13
feeling you feel that way as although I don’t have somebody on here. I was really sticking to my roots here and we just have cheeses from Eastern Canada today. But which one do you have? So I have a cheese called a mountain ash. And it comes from a company called Wren chair. Roger Akers, and these folks have been making cheese for more than 20 years in Aylesford in Nova Scotia. So on the mainland, and it’s really lovely. This is a much drier Flint to your paste. I’m guessing it’s about probably six weeks old. What you have is probably a little bit less, but it’s got that very typical Lamar Valley goat cheese, plenty dry texture, as goat cheeses, ah, they often move from lemony citrusy, they go into more mineral notes and that’s what I’m getting from this one is a little bit more of a mineral flavour profile

Natalie MacLean 21:03
mineral meaning like wet stones, or how would you describe the taste? Yeah. Okay, that’s

Janice Beaton 21:09
as I’m teaching this right now,

Natalie MacLean 21:11
because that’s a hard one to get your head around. minerality like it? Yes, sometimes a texture sometimes it tastes but I get what you’re saying. That is a lovely, I really do get the goat cheese flavour here but it’s light and beautiful at the same time. Mm hmm.

Janice Beaton 21:25
Yeah, I think that the title Bay wines are titled A varietals of the dryer and of the spectrum would be better with the goat cheese both the one you have and one I’ve got. Okay, you’re ahead of the you’ve got three title base on the go. And I just have the one. So

Natalie MacLean 21:41
that’s my usual case. I’m usually ahead of people on the line. 321 is my ranch girl from Cape Breton. Did you know?

Unknown Speaker 21:48
Yes.

Natalie MacLean 21:51
Oh, that’s really nice. The Yoast? Again, very plural a bit drier, I think than the login.

Janice Beaton 21:57
Yes. I love that. I did try hard to get the Yoast title Bay here and every nslc. I went to said, you know, they’re just not allocating us any. So it must be going to Central Canada. Yeah, I guess we’re harsh about that. here then it’s staying here at home but it’s just great that people are looking for it. So that’s the great thing.

Natalie MacLean 22:16
Would you pair any other types of wines whether from Nova Scotia or elsewhere? Do you think this sort of an ash crust goes with a certain wine type or they all like zesty white wines? Kind of?

Janice Beaton 22:26
Well, I would say more than the surface coating Natalie just the style of goat cheese itself. Actually both of you have but maybe more so this one because it is patterned after the war Valley classic lower Valley goat cheeses. So when you’re blonde would be a shoo in for this one. It would it would be a great partner to cheese that I’m tasting. But you know, Shannon laws aren’t so bad either. I’ve had some Chevron’s that are on the drier side that worked really well with this style of wine, I think. I think that Shen or Savino blonde both would work too with some real that you’re tasting but that’s often my go to varietals with goat cheeses. Someone want to go to Sorry, my very bad joke a friend.

Natalie MacLean 23:09
Okay, let’s move on before I lose it with the puns. What else have we got here? We’ve got two other cheeses. Which one would you like to taste next?

Janice Beaton 23:17
Well, I think we should go to the old Growler from that Dutchman and I know that you have the wonderful Lancaster from Ontario. Oh, so Okay. Yeah, I think we each ended up although we don’t have the same cheese. I think we have cheeses that are very similar and both very, very delicious. Mm hmm. So I’m going to take a sliver without further ado, I want to visit that Dutchman cheese array What do you call it for Marjorie?

Natalie MacLean 23:44
Yes, when you visit the actual place. He sounds like he has a lot of creative names and Jesus they are

Janice Beaton 23:49
he’s a character. He does great, great work. It’s a beautiful spot and upper economy on the Bay of Fundy. I mean, it’s worth it going to his farm. They have nature trails and all kinds of things. If people have kids, it’s a wonderful place to go and hang out. There’s gardens outside where you can eat in and beautiful infuser itself is really lovely. He makes fabulous products. This is so good.

Natalie MacLean 24:12
Well, mine is to this is the Lancaster aged Gouda, but you’ve got the

Janice Beaton 24:17
dragon’s breath. No, the dragons festival do last. So we’re going to taste two cheeses from that Dutchman which is the name of the company. But the first one we’re tasting is the one called Old Growler. We make a wide range of Buddhists, some flavours, some not, but the old growlers, there’s a number of them but what sets them apart from his other Buddhist is that they’re 12 months or older. I know he’s aged them up to as many as four or five years. As he said, You know, they call those the hammer and chisel Buddhists. Pretty much what you need to use to get them at that stage. They get so dry, but they’re very dense caramelly delicious Jesus, but this one I would say that I am tasting is closer to 12 months and again it has Beautiful caramel notes. But what I love is that there’s still a Tang, it’s not just a kind of a sweet flavour, this balance of Tang, Enos and sweetness. And you will notice we often get questions about cheeses that have what we call in the store crunchy bits. So those crunchy bits are the crystallisation of amino acids in the proteins of the milk. meeting up with calcium salts. So the combination of the calcium salts and the protein amino acids create those little crunchy particles that people really find, I think very appealing and cheese texture. So that starts as cheese ages. I mean, sometimes you can get Jesus that maybe as young as five or six months that have that development. But as the cheese ages more, you’ll get more and more of those crunchy particles. I am loving the crunchy bits.

Natalie MacLean 25:48
Yeah, I think fun. I just wanna keep eating. Which one would we move to the Nova seven for this one, do you think?

Janice Beaton 25:55
Well, I’m going to taste it because I still have a little title Bay in my class. I’m going to try it. And then I’m going to pour a little of the note seven. Oh, see what happens. I like your analysis. Yes.

Natalie MacLean 26:07
That’s the title Bay. I’m going to open the Nova seven which just hit the shelves up here in Ontario a big splash. It’s made by Benjamin bridge in Nova Scotia and their rosae sparkling was one of only two wines selected to represent Canada at the Olympics this summer.

Janice Beaton 26:24
kudos to them. They are making some great ones.

Natalie MacLean 26:28
Yeah, if you can still get your hands on this one.

Janice Beaton 26:31
Wow. It’s so refreshing. But it’s got that frizzante you know, that little bit of effervescence? Yes, that’s a great quality in a wine when you’re having it with cheese. We often say that if you’re if you had to choose just one thing to have with cheese. And I think some people might argue food in general, champagne is the way to go, or sparkling wine, but it’s that effervescence and the acidity together that really do a great job when it comes to how they partner with Jesus. So

Natalie MacLean 26:58
literally cleansing your palate like it almost sounds like a stuffy term, but there’s a real concept behind that in that cheese is very mouth coating because of the lovely fat that is our friend. But then the champagne or sparkling wine zips in there with the bubbles and the acidity and just rushes that all the way so that the next bite tastes almost as good as the first it’s not as good.

Unknown Speaker 27:19
I couldn’t have put it better.

Natalie MacLean 27:26
Well, there you have it. I hope you enjoyed my chat with Janice Beaton. Here are my takeaways. Number one, I love how Janice draws the parallels between cheese and wine fanatics. Because cheese and wine are so sensual. They’re playing with all of our senses taste, touch, smell, sight, even hearing, if you count those squeaky cheese curds and the popping of a cork, too. I also like her take on how wine and cheese go so well together, not just because they’re liquid and solid. But also because wines acidity is a terrific counterpoint to the fat and protein and cheese. And three, there’s the immigrant influence for both wine and cheese. Ancient traditional recipes brought from the old world to the new one that find a unique expression here under a different climate, soil. terroir you won’t want to miss next week when I’ll be chatting with genospecies. Again, what about different cheeses. In the meantime, if you missed Episode 62 with Jamie Evans, go back and take a listen. You’ll learn about a completely and I mean completely different type of pairing, wine and cannabis. I’ll share a short clip with you now to whet your appetite.

Janice Beaton 28:51
It turns out that 72% of cannabis users also drink alcohol, and many of those are wine consumers. Cannabis consumers also tend to be epicureans. So we really like the finer things in life much like the wine consumer and California is just becoming this mainstream product. So it seems like there’s people from all groups ages that are enjoying cannabis right now. What is CBD oil gin? So CBD is the non psychoactive component of cannabis. Basically, there’s common cannabinoids, so THC, which kind of gives you that head height, that’s a cannabinoid, but then you also have CBD, which is the non psychoactive part. But think about this as CBD can also be derived from him. So maybe that’s why it’s legal is because hemp, at least in the United States is legal in all 50 states. So that’s why a lot of companies here are actually taking the CBD out of hemp rather than cannabis derived.

Natalie MacLean 29:51
If you liked this episode, please tell one friend about it this week, especially someone who would be interested in the wine and cheese pairing tips. janish shared, you’ll find links to the wines and cheeses we tasted where you can find me on Facebook Live every second Wednesday at 7pm including this evening. If you’re listening to this podcast on the day it’s published, and how you can join me in a free online wine and food pairing class. That’s all in the show notes at Natalie MacLean comm forward slash 95 Thank you for taking the time to join me here. I hope something great is in your class this week. Perhaps a wine that pairs perfectly with the cheesy low.

You don’t want to miss one juicy episode of this podcast, especially the secret full body bonus episodes that I don’t announce on social media. So subscribe for free now at Natalie maclean.com forward slash subscribe. May be here next week. Cheers

 

 

 

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