Behind the Scenes: A Wine Writer’s Life

Introduction When I attend a social event that’s outside the wine industry and I’m asked about my job, I often joke that I drink for a living. After I clarify that I write about wine, I usually get questions about what exactly that involves and some misconceptions about drinking Champagne all day in between planning luxe trips to Tuscany and Napa Valley. However, it’s not all beer and Skittles, rainbows and unicorns. On today’s episode of Unreserved Wine Talk, I thought that since there’s always been quite a bit of curiousity about what I do, I’ll take you behind the […]

read more …

Read More

Airline Wine: Flights of Wine You Can Drink Without Reservations

Introduction If you want great wine these days you don’t have to fly thousands of miles to get it, you can sip it en route. But getting wine to taste delicious at 30,000 feet isn’t easy. If you’re flying somewhere anytime soon, you’ll find our chat about airline wines today uplifting. In this episode of the Unreserved Wine Talk podcast, I’m going to cover which wines are best to drink when you’re in the air, how your sense of smell and taste change, and why airlines are paying more attention to their wine selections on board these days. Enjoy!   […]

read more …

Read More

Do Flights of #Wine on This Airline Give You a Vertigo Tasting?

 Leanne and I chat about what happens to our perception of wine when we fly, as well as other travel-related tips with wine. In our first segment, we chat about my online wine course. My dream flight begins with the wine selection: “We’d like to direct your attention to the wine list in the seat pocket in front of you. You’ll note we have a fine selection of first-growth Bordeaux at the rear of the plane (using the double-arm, two-finger signal), 40-year vintage port is being decanted in the middle aisles and, for our first-class passengers, a vertical of […]

read more …

Read More

Is This Taking Airline #Wine to a Whole New Plane?

Continued from Part 1 of Airline Wine … Turns out, of course, the same wines were served in all three tastings. Before the wine even gets on board, it must survive the labyrinthine logistics of thousands of flights and destinations. Ken Chase, who consults to Delta, admits to doing strange things with wine, such as heating, chilling and shaking it, to ensure that the wine can withstand the cooking on the tarmac in Mexico or being rick-shawed through bumpy streets in Bangkok. Will the wine still perform in your glass after it’s been rerouted through Iceland? Fortunately, most airlines have […]

read more …

Read More

Flying First Class, Drinking Economy: Is This Cloud Nine #Wine?

Continued from Part 2 of Airline Wine … The now defunct Canadian Airlines’ wine program used to take take the opposite approach, serving wines that passengers couldn’t buy on the ground — wineries had agree not to sell the airline’s selections in Canada. (That’s probably not the primary reason the company went under, but you never know which is the last drop that makes your cup overflowth.) Many airlines use an outside tasting panel to make the final choices. The oenological literati advises British Airways: Hugh Johnson, Michael Broadbent and Jancis Robinson who says in her memoir that after gushing […]

read more …

Read More

Airline #Wine is Taking Off

Natalie MacLean is an accredited sommelier, wine journalist and author of Red, White, and Drunk All Over: A Wine-Soaked Journey from Grape to Glass. I understand you travelled extensively to research your book. Yes, I spent three years sipping and spitting my way through various vineyards around Europe and around North America – Burgundy, Champagne and California, among others. How do you research your stories? You can only say so much about wine by just opening the bottle: it’s wet, it’s fruity, it tastes good or it doesn’t. The story of wine is the story about the place, where it’s […]

read more …

Read More