By Gaby Israel

Here are my best cellar wines for this release as a shopping list that you can print and these are my recommendations in order of preference for an up-to $100 release budget:

Great wines under $20

Chile – Maycas del Limari Reserva Especial Syrah 2008 – $19.95

Maycas has a few wines in this release. According to the producer, in the last decade, the Limarí Valley has experienced an explosive growth, from 93 hectares of vineyards planted in 1995 to 1,667 today. The Limari Valley is sitting at a latitude of 30 degrees south at the north end of Chile. The region lies along the southern border of the Atacama, the driest desert in the world. There is always something very special and well made for my taste in the Chilean Syrah. They are usually full, spicy combined with sweet-bitter finish. This wine got 91 by RP and can be cellared until 2020. With such supportive review and for such price, it’s definitely one of my release favorites.

Chile – Sol de Andes Reserva Especial Syrah 2008 – $17.95

This winery was established only 9 years ago. Another Syrah from Chile that costs $18 and got 90-92 by RP. How about an interesting BBQ evening with this wine, the Maycas Syrah and the 2010 Domaine Des Fees Cote-Du-Rhone – and let the games begin…

Spain – Abanico Tempestad Godello 2010 – $17.95

I love the different unique white grapes in Spain (e.g. Albarnio) – very sea food friendly and an excellent companion for the summer. Godello is yet another exciting white variety of wine grape grown in northwestern Spain, in particular in Galicia. Great review by RP who gave it 92 (!).

France – Domaine Des Fees Cote-Du-Rhone 2010 – $14.95

I keep looking for 2010 Rhone Valley ‘steals’ and this seems to fit the bill (btw – in the US it is sold for $8.99). RP gave this wine 90 and if it’s as good as the review (“Chateauneuf du Pape wearing a Cotes du Rhone mask”), for $15, what’s not to like here. It’s a 50-50 Grenache and Syrah blend. This is probably my next “house wine”.

Chile – Anakena Single Vinyard Pinot Noir 2010 – $15.95

I had an outstanding Burgundy Pinot a week ago (see review here). It cost almost $100 to be as good. Since I like Anakena’s Single Vinyard series wines and it cost $16, it really got my attention. Have to try it and let you know whether it’s “sufficient” or whether you need to spend three figures to ‘get it’.

France – Chateau Fourcas Dumont 2001 – $19.95

Located at the Listrac-Medoc area. Three grape-varieties can be found there : Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Petit Verdot. Interestingly enough, buying this 2001 wine through the winery website costs the same as buying it through the LCBO – impressive! You won’t have too many opportunities to try an 11 year old Bordeaux for $20 and based on the various reviews it’s definitely worth trying.

Wines for $20-$30 worth checking:

France – Romaine Duvernay Vacqueyras 2009 – $24.95
A blend of old Grenache (65%), Syrah (20%) and Mourvedre (15%). Since I love a good Vacqueras from the wonderful 2009 vintage, and since this one is highly rated (RP=93) and could be cellared for the next 10+ years or so, the GPCi ‘dictates’ a great buy.

Germany – Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler Riesling Spätlese Wehlener Sonnenuhr, Pradikätswein, Mosel 2009 – $21.95

My radar is always looking for great Rieslings, Spätlese if possible, from the 2009 vintage that can gracefully age. And lo and behold, here is one… WS gave it 93(!) and suggested it can be cellared until 2030 (!!). say no more, say no more…

For deeper pockets:

Italy – Marziano Abbona Pressenda Barolo 2007 – $43.95

The Abbona winery was established in 1970. The Nebbiolo grapes were planted in the Pressenda Vineyard in 1976 and first production was only 20 years later. Its average altitude is 450m facing south. RP rated this wine with an impressive 94 and indicated that it can be cellared until 2027+, which makes its GPCi a strong buying recommendation.

Italy – Poggiotondo Brunello di Montalcino 2006 – $34.95

This Brunello was made at Tenuta Piedranera, located near Siena in Tuscany. Another great 2006 Brunello with raving review from RP who rated it 93 and indicated a drinking window of 2014-2026. According to the reviews, expect big Brunello. Buy 2-6 bottles.

 

Gaby Israel has been providing wine tasting notes and buying recommendations for several years now.

The name WineGPCi (pronounced Wine Gypsy) was given by his friends. GPCi stands for Gaby’s Potential Cellaring Index. While searching for “treasures for the cellar” without going to the bank, the GPCi was initially used to calculate the ratio between the price of the wine and the number of years it can potentially be cellared for; trying to find the wines that had the smallest index/ratio possible.

Any good wine that had a GPCi of 3.5 and under, was worth buying (mainly if you were planning to develop a cellar). Many years and “750 bottles in the cellar” after, his knowledge, experience and passion continued to grow. He continues to focus on helping the consumer finding “logical” ways of buying wines and planning the budget for it.

His great passion for wine revolves around old-world wines such as Spain, France and Italy while experimenting the new world exciting regions of Chile, Argentina, Australia, Canada, the United States and others.